Recently in Sustainable Homes Category

Green Home and Garden Tour

| |

Peterborough Green-Up a local environmental group is holding a green home and garden tour on June 7, 2008, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. We're a part of the tour in addition to several interesting homes and businesses in Peterborough proper.

Details are available on the Green-up website.

Normally if you'd like a tour of our house you have to wait for the annual OSBBC Straw House Tour in October, so this is an early opportunity if October doesn't work for you.

From the Green-up site: Take a tour of homes and businesses where real people are making real changes to reduce their impact on our local resources. These sites will showcase some of the inspirational environmental examples that residents in Peterborough are setting through personal actions.

Tour locations highlight examples of green lifestyles, including a totally off grid home, using recycled building materials, hot water heating, solar and wind energy, and more! Extensive natural gardens will also be on display at some tour stops, with examples of how to create great gardens while conserving water, providing habitat and food for wildlife, and enhancing the environment!

Another Straw House Blog

| |

There are lots of blogs out there now about straw bale (and other) homes, but we met Kara and Dave a while ago when they passed through Ontario on vacation. I'm excited that they've started construction on their own home, you can watch their progress on their blog.

Recommended Reading

| |

I've added a recommended reading section to the house section of the website. In this section I'll be listing the various books that we used while designing and building the house as well as other books that we have found helpful recently. If you're looking to learn about straw bale building, passive solar design or off-grid power these books make excellent resources.

Paudash Lake House

| |

I returned last night from four days working with the gang from Camel's Back on a house on Paudash Lake, just south of Bancroft. In addition to Pete and Tina, Stephen, Lesley, Ryan and new guy Paul were also out. It's a neat house, most of the wood was cut from the property, and it's built with hemp bales. It's first time that I've worked on a house built with hemp bales. They're a pain in the ass. The hemp doesn't rip, it's bleeding hard to pierce them and they dull any blade. I think I'll stick with regular straw for my next project.

Paudash Lake House

There's a neat/strange story behind the house though. The house was designed to fit on a pre-existing foundation. Imagine that you own some land. An acreage even, and one day you head out for a walk on that land and find the very definate beginnings of a house being built, on your property. That is what happened to the people Regis bought her land from. It seems that several brothers owned the land next door, and one of them decided to build himself a house. So he put in a foundation, a well, and a septic system. Apparently the brother didn't have an accurate survey (or perhaps any survey at all). When this geographical faux-pas was brought to his attention his reaction was ... litigation - even after the actual owners offered to sell him the land at a very good price, even though he had already sunk so much money and effort into the property. He lost and Regis bought a piece of land with a foundation, a well, and a septic system. It's a very nice piece of land with towering spruce trees and a view of the land to the east. The house will be off-grid, but I didn't manage to get the details of the system.

Here are the pictures.

Coboconk House

| |

I spent a good portion of the week helping build a straw bale cottage up on Balsam Lake. The property is owned by a lovely lady named Gerarda Schouten, a retired schoolteacher who has decided to make the lake her home.

It's a nice simple design with a bright and airy main floor for Gerarda, with a deck and straw bale sunroom, and a walkout basement with full guest quarters.

We've been doing bale work for the last two weeks, stacking, stuffing and stitching, work that I didn't get to do much of on my own house. When we were doing the bale work here I spent most of my time dealing with the building inspector, the roof, the architect, and the infinite number of other questions that cropped up. It's a running joke with Pete and Tina that the owners stack the first bale because they might not get a chance to stack another! At least not until the next day when things have generally calmed down. Next week they'll be plastering and I'll be out there again for a couple of days, baling isn't easy work but plastering is HARD work.

A reporter came out from the Lindsay Daily Post to do an article on Gerarda and her new home.

But what you really want are the pictures... right?

Contact Us

Twitter Status

Amazon Wishlist

Powered By

Powered by Movable Type 4.261

Google Ads